How should clinical wound care and management translate to effective engineering standard testing requirements from foam dressings? Mapping the existing gaps and needs - PubMed

How should clinical wound care and management translate to effective engineering standard testing requirements from foam dressings? Mapping the existing gaps and needs - PubMed

. 2022 Feb 25.
doi: 10.1089/wound.2021.0173. Online ahead of print.
How should clinical wound care and management translate to effective engineering standard testing requirements from foam dressings? Mapping the existing gaps and needs
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Affiliations
1 Tel Aviv University, Biomedical Engineering, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel, Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv, Outside US and Canada, Israel, 6997801.
2 Ayelet Haimy; gefen@eng.tau.ac.il.
3 Catholic University of Portugal, 59207, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Health, Porto, Portugal; pjalves@ucp.pt.
4 Ghent University, 26656, Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health, Gent, Belgium.
5 Örebro University, 6233, Swedish Centre for Skin and Wound Research, School of Health Sciences, Orebro, Örebro, Sweden; Dimitri.Beeckman@ugent.be.
6 RedC Consultancy, Bradford, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; drbredacullen@gmail.com.
7 Complutense University of Madrid, 16734, Madrid, Comunidad de Madrid, Spain; diabetes@ucm.es.
8 University of Miami School of Medicine, 12235, Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, Miami, Florida, United States; hlevtov@med.miami.edu.
9 Baylor College of Medicine, 3989, Michael E DeBakey Department of Surgery, Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy, 7200 Cambridge Street,, Rm B01.532 (iCAMP), Houston, Texas, United States, 77030; bijan.najafi@bcm.edu.
10 University of Melbourne VCCC, 569586, School of Health Sciences, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; n.santamaria@unimelb.edu.au.
11 Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, 7047, Salford Care Organisation, Salford, Salford, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; Andrew.Sharpe@srft.nhs.uk.
12 Nurse Practitioner, Warrnambool, Victoria, Australia; swansonterry7@gmail.com.
13 Queen's University, 92 Barrie Street, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, K7L3N6.
14 Canada; kevin.woo@queensu.ca.
DOI: 10.1089/wound.2021.0173
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How should clinical wound care and management translate to effective engineering standard testing requirements from foam dressings? Mapping the existing gaps and needs
Amit Gefen et al. Adv Wound Care (New Rochelle).
2022
Adv Wound Care (New Rochelle)
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doi: 10.1089/wound.2021.0173. Online ahead of print.
Authors
Amit Gefen   1   2 ,  Paulo Alves   3 ,  Dimitri Beeckman   4   5 ,  Breda Cullen   6 ,  José Luis Lázaro Martínez   7 ,  Hadar Avihai Lev-Tov   8 ,  Bijan Najafi   9 ,  Nick Santamaria   10 ,  Andrew Sharpe   11 ,  Terry Swanson   12 ,  Kevin Woo   13   14
Affiliations
1 Tel Aviv University, Biomedical Engineering, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel, Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv, Outside US and Canada, Israel, 6997801.
2 Ayelet Haimy; gefen@eng.tau.ac.il.
3 Catholic University of Portugal, 59207, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Health, Porto, Portugal; pjalves@ucp.pt.
4 Ghent University, 26656, Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health, Gent, Belgium.
5 Örebro University, 6233, Swedish Centre for Skin and Wound Research, School of Health Sciences, Orebro, Örebro, Sweden; Dimitri.Beeckman@ugent.be.
6 RedC Consultancy, Bradford, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; drbredacullen@gmail.com.
7 Complutense University of Madrid, 16734, Madrid, Comunidad de Madrid, Spain; diabetes@ucm.es.
8 University of Miami School of Medicine, 12235, Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, Miami, Florida, United States; hlevtov@med.miami.edu.
9 Baylor College of Medicine, 3989, Michael E DeBakey Department of Surgery, Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy, 7200 Cambridge Street,, Rm B01.532 (iCAMP), Houston, Texas, United States, 77030; bijan.najafi@bcm.edu.
10 University of Melbourne VCCC, 569586, School of Health Sciences, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; n.santamaria@unimelb.edu.au.
11 Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, 7047, Salford Care Organisation, Salford, Salford, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; Andrew.Sharpe@srft.nhs.uk.
12 Nurse Practitioner, Warrnambool, Victoria, Australia; swansonterry7@gmail.com.
13 Queen's University, 92 Barrie Street, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, K7L3N6.
14 Canada; kevin.woo@queensu.ca.
Format
Abstract
Significance: Wounds of all types remain one of the most important, expensive and common medical problems, e.g., up to approximately two-thirds of the work time of community nurses is spent on wound management. Many wounds are treated by means of dressings. The materials used in a dressing, their microarchitecture and how they are composed and constructed form the basis for the laboratory and clinical performances of any advanced dressing. Recent Advances: The established structure-function principle in material science is reviewed and analyzed in this article in the context of wound dressings. This principle states that the microstructure determines the physical, mechanical, and fluid transport and handling properties, all of which are critically important for, and relevant to the adequate performances of wound dressings.
Critical issues: According to the above principle, once the clinical requirements for wound care and management are defined for a given wound type and etiology, it should be theoretically possible to translate clinically-relevant characteristics of dressings into physical test designs resulting specific metrics of materials, mechanical, and fluid transport and handling properties, all of which should be determined to meet the clinical objectives and be measurable through standardized bench testing.
Future directions: This multidisciplinary review article, written by an International Wound Dressing Technology Expert Panel, discusses the translation of clinical wound care and management into effective, basic engineering standard testing requirements from wound dressings with respect to material types, microarchitecture and properties, to achieve the desirable performance in supporting healing and improving the quality of life of patients.

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